The Motorcycle Rider Behavior Questionnaire: Psychometric properties and application amongst novice riders in Australia

Chika Sakashita, Teresa Senserrick, Serigne Lo, Liz de Rome, Rebecca Ivers

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    22 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The Motorcycle Rider Behavior Questionnaire (MRBQ) was developed to measure behavioral factors influencing motorcyclists' crash risk including errors and violations as well as the use of motorcycle safety equipment via self-report. The aims of the present study were to (1) examine the previously examined psychometric properties of the MRBQ including the factor structure, internal consistency, and predictive validity in terms of self-reported crashes amongst experienced riders in the UK and Turkey; (2) examine the psychometric properties of the MRBQ not yet examined, including its stability, content validity, and predictive validity in terms of police-recorded crashes and offences as well as self-reported near crashes and crashes; and (3) assess the applicability of the MRBQ to a population of novice riders in Australia, to whom the MRBQ has not been applied to date. Novice riders (N = 1305) in the state of Victoria, Australia participated in the present study. Confirmatory factor analyses showed that the present data did not fit with the previously found factor models in experienced riders in the UK and Turkey. Principal axis factoring was performed to respecify the MRBQ factor model amongst novice riders and revealed four scales: errors; speed violations; stunts; and protective gear. The insufficient internal consistency, stability, content and predictive validity demonstrated by the MRBQ in the present study and some inconsistencies amongst the three MRBQ studies suggest that the development and refinement of the MRBQ items are required before wider use of the MRBQ instrument, especially amongst novice riders. Possible causes of the limited reliability and validity of the current MRBQ are discussed to inform further development and refinement of the items, thereby making the MRBQ more useful in future research to understand and evaluate riders' behaviors.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)126-139
    Number of pages14
    JournalTRANSPORTATION RESEARCH PART F-TRAFFIC PSYCHOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR
    Volume22
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

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