The myth of sovereignty: British immigration control in policy and practice in the nineteen-seventies

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    Abstract

    This article explores how British immigration control policy was carried out during the nineteen-seventies to filter immigration, while addressing the perceived problem of 'non-white' colonial migration. Recently released government documents suggest that the immigration control system should be viewed as a series of inter-connected institutions and actors that operated under the influence of a number of different, and often contradictory, factors. The result of these competing factors was an immigration control system that, relying on the paradoxical whims of the government and other sections of civil society, was restrictive and suspicious towards potential migrants, but at the same time constrained in its behaviour.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)344-369
    Number of pages26
    JournalHISTORICAL RESEARCH
    Volume87
    Issue number236
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 2014

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