The natural history of the sleepy lizard, Tiliqua rugosa (Gray, 1825) – Insight from chance observations and long-term research on a common Australian skink species

Gerrut Norval, Michael G. Gardner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In an effort to better understand the dynamics of the parapatric boundary in South Australia of the ticks Amblyomma limbatum and Bothriocroton hydrosauri the late Professor C. Michael Bull initiated studies into the ecology of sleepy lizards (Tiliqua rugosa), a common host of these parasites. These studies spanned a period of about 40 years and examined aspects such as monogamy, long-term mate fidelity, social networks, personality, resource use and the transmission of parasites and other pathogens. This review incorporates the results of these studies with other information about this species to provide a comprehensive overview of its natural history, highlighting not only what is known, but also indicates areas that require further study.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)410-417
Number of pages8
JournalAustral Ecology
Volume45
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2020

Keywords

  • bobtail lizard
  • monogamy
  • parasite-host interaction
  • shingleback lizard
  • social network

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