The paradox of public science and global business: CSIRO, commercialisation and the national system of innovation in Australia

Lyndal-Joy Thompson, Michael Gilding, Thomas H. Spurling, Greg Simpson, Ian R. Elsum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article describes three case studies of the commercialisation of early-stage technologies involving CSIRO; extended-wear contact lenses, biostable biocompatible polymers for medical implant devices, and biodegradable biocompatible polymers for medical implant devices. The case studies extend the portfolio of detailed, highly contextualised studies of innovation in the Australian context. They also provide a window into CSIRO, commercialisation pathways and the national system of innovation in Australia. In particular, they highlight the paradox of public science and global business in the Australian context. The paradox is that global business depends upon public science for innovation more than ever, but makes it increasingly difficult for countries to capture the benefits of public science. It adds major complexity to the successful realisation of a more commercial approach by Australia's public research organisations such as CSIRO, and the capture of benefits from the national system of innovation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)327-340
Number of pages14
JournalInnovation: Management, Policy and Practice
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Commercialisation
  • Csiro
  • Innovation
  • National system of innovation
  • Research

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