The psychological impact of participating in colorectal cancer screening by faecal immuno-chemical testing - The Australian experience

Amanda Bobridge, Peter Bampton, Stephen Cole, Helen Lewis, Graeme Young

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    13 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: Occult blood-based colorectal cancer (CRC) screening may result in adverse psychological outcomes for participants. The aims of this study were to measure the psychological consequences of participating in screening at key points along the screening and diagnostic pathway, and examine variation over time within or between test outcome groups. Methods: A total of 301 people (positives=165, negatives=136) aged 50-76 years were surveyed via validated psychological questionnaires after result notification, post colonoscopy (positives only) and 1 year following result notification. Results: Negatives scored significantly higher in quality of life domains and lower state anxiety, anger and depression in comparison to positives both after result notification and at 1 year follow-up. Positives had significantly decreased state anxiety and depression at 1 year and improvement in HLoC power and reduced screening decision doubtfulness post colonoscopy. Positives experienced heightened CRC risk perception both after result notification and at 1 year follow-up in comparison to negatives, but reported less difficulty participating in ongoing screening. Conclusions: In positives, increased anxiety and doubtfulness about the decision to screen declined over time. Lower CRC risk perception in negatives indicates the need for education to promote CRC screening participation.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)970-975
    Number of pages6
    JournalBritish Journal of Cancer
    Volume111
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

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