The relevance of platelet and fibrinogen kinetics and coagulation studies to extent of disease and performance status in patients with adenocarcinoma

C. K.O. Williams, G. F. Pineo, A. S. Gallus, P. B. McCulloch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study of 18 cancer patients, results of laboratory evaluation of a “hyper‐coagulable state” have been correlated with the extent of the disease and the functional activity of the patients. Most coagulation tests were normal. Higher levels of serum fibrinogen degradation products were associated with wider dissemination of disease. Fibrinogen survival time (t 1/2) was shorter in patients with extensive disease than in those with less extensive disease (P < 0.05); platelet t1/2 was also shorter in the former group, though not significantly. Coexistence of severest physical disability and extensive disease was associated with the most marked reduction of platelet and fibrinogen t1/2. There was little correlation between platelet and fibrinogen t1/2, thus suggesting independent mechanisms of destruction of the two blood components. We suggest that future studies of hemostatic changes in cancer patients should include assessment of impairment of physical performance of the patients, as well as the extent of the tumor.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)367-374
Number of pages8
JournalMedical and Pediatric Oncology
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1980
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • adenocarcinoma
  • extent of disease
  • Fibrinogen turnover
  • hypercoagulable state
  • performance status
  • platelet turnover

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