The Role of Controlled Surface Topography and Chemistry on Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Attachment, Growth and Self-Renewal

Melanie Macgregor, Rachel Williams, Joni Downes, Akash Bachhuka, Krasimir Vasilev

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The success of stem cell therapies relies heavily on our ability to control their fate in vitro during expansion to ensure an appropriate supply. The biophysical properties of the cell culture environment have been recognised as a potent stimuli influencing cellular behaviour. In this work we used advanced plasma-based techniques to generate model culture substrates with controlled nanotopographical features of 16 nm, 38 nm and 68 nm in magnitude, and three differently tailored surface chemical functionalities. The effect of these two surface properties on the adhesion, spreading, and self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) were assessed. The results demonstrated that physical and chemical cues influenced the behaviour of these stem cells in in vitro culture in different ways. The size of the nanotopographical features impacted on the cell adhesion, spreading and proliferation, while the chemistry influenced the cell self-renewal and differentiation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1081
Number of pages13
JournalMaterials
Volume10
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Sep 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Extra Cellular Matrix chemical cues
  • Extra Cellular Matrix physical cues
  • Fibronectin
  • Mouse embryonic stem cells
  • Nanotopography
  • Plasma polymer
  • Polyacrylic acid
  • Polyallylamine
  • Polyoctadiene

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