The role of expectations in the effect of food cue exposure on consumption in restrained eaters

Eva Kemps, Marika Tiggemann, Sarah Hollitt, Ivanka Prichard, Janet Polivy, C Herman

    Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractpeer-review

    Abstract

    We examined the role of expectations in the effect of cue exposure on consumption. Participants were exposed to high and low caloric food cues (grapes and cookies) and told to expect to taste and rate either grapes or cookies. They then received the expected or non-expected food. Restrained eaters ate less than unrestrained eaters when expecting to taste cookies, but not when expecting to taste grapes. Findings support counteractive control theory: expecting to eat a high-caloric food enabled restrained eaters to activate their dieting goal, thereby restricting their intake. Findings highlight an important role for expectations in regulating food intake.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages29
    Number of pages1
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2017
    EventBiennial Meeting of the Society for Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, 2017 - University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
    Duration: 3 Jan 20176 Jan 2017
    Conference number: 12th

    Conference

    ConferenceBiennial Meeting of the Society for Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, 2017
    Abbreviated titleSARMAC XII
    CountryAustralia
    CitySydney
    Period3/01/176/01/17
    OtherThe Society for Applied Research in Memory and Cognition (SARMAC) is dedicated to encouraging and promoting quality scientific research in applied domains. The purpose of the Society is to enhance collaboration and co-operation between basic and applied researchers in memory and cognition. SARMAC meets every two years to showcase our most recent research in a wide and varied program.

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