The SMART-COP score performs well for pneumonia risk stratification in Australia's Tropical Northern Territory: a prospective cohort study

Karen Robins-Browne, Allen Cheng, Kathleen Thomas, Didier Palmer, Bart Currie, Joshua Davis

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective To prospectively compare a modified pneumonia severity scoring system, SMARTACOP, with other severity scores in patients presenting with pneumonia to the emergency department (ED) of a tertiary referral hospital in tropical Australia. Methods We conducted a prospective observational study of adult patients presenting with radiologically confirmed pneumonia over a 12-month period. The sensitivity of risk stratification scores were assessed against the need for intensive respiratory or vasopressor support (IRVS). Results There were 367 ED attendances for pneumonia of whom 77.1% were admitted to hospital, 10% required intensive respiratory or vasopressor support and 2.8% died. Mean age was 50.0years, 52% were men and 59% were Indigenous. The sensitivity of a SMART-COP score ≥3, a SMARTACOP score ≥3 and a pneumonia severity index (PSI) class ≥3 for predicting IRVS was 97%, 97% and 78% respectively. Conclusions We found no significant advantage of the SMARTACOP over the SMART-COP score for the prediction of intensive respiratory or vasopressor support, but both scores significantly outperformed PSI. The SMART-COP score should replace the PSI in tropical Australia and should be assessed in other tropical areas for pneumonia risk stratification in emergency departments.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)914-919
    Number of pages6
    JournalTropical Medicine and International Health
    Volume17
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2012

    Keywords

    • Critical illness
    • Emergency service
    • Pneumonia
    • Tropical medicine

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