The teaching of occupational and environmental medicine to medical students in Australia and New Zealand

E. Michael Shanahan, A. M. Murray, T. Lillington, E A Farmer

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    15 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    All the medical schools in Australia and New Zealand were surveyed in order to determine the amount of teaching devoted to occupational and environmental medicine in the medical courses in 1998. A 100% response rate was achieved. The results showed that the number of hours devoted to these topics varied widely, but averaged 12.8 h and 10.5 topics. The most significant factor accounting for the variability was the presence on the universities' teaching staff of individuals trained in the practice of occupational medicine. While our findings show a greater time devoted to these topics than those of similar studies in the United States and Britain, the absolute time remains small when compared with the prevalence of occupational medicine problems in the community. There is little congruence in terms of both content and assessment processes between schools.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)246-250
    Number of pages5
    JournalOccupational Medicine
    Volume50
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 2000

    Keywords

    • Medical students
    • Occupational medicine teaching

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