The use of conversational agents in rehabilitation following brain injury, disease, or stroke: A scoping review protocol

Judith Hocking, Candice Oster, Anthony Maeder

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Background:
Rehabilitation for adults with brain injury or disease or stroke provides goal-directed care to overcome functional impairments and reduced independence. However, recovery can be impacted due to rehabilitation being time limited. New therapy approaches supporting rehabilitation and self-management are warranted. Conversational agents provide personal computer-based dialogues that can be designed to meet the specific needs of clients. Interacting with a conversational agent may support rehabilitation for clients with brain injury, disease or stroke.
Objective:
The objective of the review is to identify peer-reviewed literature reporting the design and use of conversational agents in rehabilitation for adults with brain injury, disease, or stroke.
Inclusion criteria:
Studies, written in English, that report the design and/or use of conversational agents in rehabilitation for adults aged over 18 years with brain injury, disease, or stroke will be considered for inclusion. Research settings may include hospitals, community settings, and homes. Eligible study types are peer-reviewed research protocols, prototype development papers, and pilot and clinical trials.
Methods:
Primary sourcing databases (MEDLINE [Ovid], Scopus, ProQuest, Web of Science) and gray literature sources will be searched with no data range limitations. Only studies published in English will be considered due to feasibility limitations. The JBI System for the Unified Management, Assessment and Review of Information (JBI SUMARI) will be used. Two independent reviewers will screen the retrieved papers by title and abstract, and the selected papers by full-text review. Any disagreements will be resolved by an objective arbitrator. Data to be extracted and analyzed from included papers will include details of participants, concept, context, and the study design. Results will be presented narratively and in tabular format.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages13
JournalJBI Evidence Synthesis
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 14 Dec 2020

Keywords

  • brain injury
  • conversational agent
  • dementia
  • Parkinson Disease
  • stroke

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