The use of instructional design guidelines to increase effectiveness of postpartum hemorrhage simulation training

Brena de Melo, Ana Falbo, Arno Muijtjens, Cees van der Vleuten, Jeroen Van Merrienboer

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective: To compare learning outcomes of postpartum hemorrhage simulation training based on either instructional design guidelines or best practice. Methods: A pretest–post-test non-equivalent groups study was conducted among obstetrics and gynecology residents in Recife, Brazil, from June 8 to August 30, 2013. The instructional design group included 13 teams, whereas the best practice group included seven teams. A standardized task checklist was used for scenario analysis and the proportion of correctly executed tasks compared (post-test minus pretest). Results: The instructional design group scored higher than the best practice group for total number of tasks completed (median difference 0.46 vs 0.17; P<0.001; effect size [r]=0.72). Similar results were observed for communication (median difference 0.56 vs 0.22; P=0.004; r=0.58), laboratory evaluation (median difference 0.83 vs 0.00; P<0.001; r=0.76), and mechanical management (median difference 0.25 vs –0.15; P=0.048; r=0.39). Speed of learning was also increased. The median differences were 0.20 for the instructional design group compared with 0.05 for the best practice group at 60 seconds (P=0.015; r=0.49), and 0.49 versus 0.26 (P=0.001; r=0.65) at 360 seconds. Conclusion: The use of simulation training for postpartum hemorrhage that was based on instructional design guidelines yielded better learning outcomes than did training based on best practice.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)99-105
    Number of pages7
    JournalInternational Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics
    Volume137
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2017

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