The well-being of australian adolescents and young adults with self-reported long-term health conditions, impairments or disabilities: 2001 and 2006

Eric Emerson, Anne Honey, Ros Madden, Gwynnyth Llewellyn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As noted in the preamble to the 2007 UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, 'persons with disabilities continue to face barriers in their participation as equal members of society and violations of their human rights in all parts of the world'. In this paper we present nationally representative data on the nature and level of disadvantage faced by young Australians with a long-term health condition, impairment or disability in 2001 and 2006. The results suggest that: (1) when compared with their non-disabled peers, young Australians with a long-term health condition, impairment or disability face pervasive social and material hardship and have lower subjective well-being; (2) no progress was made between 2001 and 2006 in equalising the opportunities of young Australians with a long-term health condition, impairment or disability; (3) lower subjective well-being is not inherently associated with disability, but is contingent on the experience of social exclusion and material hardship.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)39-54
Number of pages15
JournalAustralian Journal of Social Issues
Volume44
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Disability
  • Discrimination
  • Quality of life

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