There is moderate evidence for the effectiveness of occupation and activity-based interventions for people with traumatic brain injury although more evidence is needed for interventions provided specifically by occupational therapists

Miia Rahja, Laura Jolliffe

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

Objective: To establish the effectiveness of occupation and activity‐based interventions to improve everyday activities and areas of occupation and social participation for people with traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Design: Systematic review. The review met criteria for AMSTAR 2 (Shea et al., 2017) domains 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 9, 13 and 14, partially met criteria for domain 4, failed to meet criteria for domains 7, 8, 10 and 16. Domains 11, 12 and 15 were not applicable as no meta‐analysis was conducted.

Methods of review: The search strategy was developed with a medical research librarian. Databases searched: Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL, OTseeker and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Risk of bias was assessed using well‐recognised appraisal tools.

Selection criteria: Studies included: Level I, II and III evidence as described by Sackett, Rosenberg, Muir Gray, Haynes and Richardson (1996). Exact search date was not reported. Review included studies published between 2008‐2013 and in English. Population: Adults with TBI. Interventions: Occupation and activity‐based interventions (which did not have to be delivered by an occupational therapist). Outcome of interest: The effects on everyday activities, occupations and/or social participation.

Results: The search resulted in 1044 abstract screens, 60 full‐text manuscript reviews and 19 study inclusions (level I – 10, level II – 4, level III – 5). Moderate evidence was found for a range of multi‐ and interdisciplinary rehabilitation approaches and community‐based rehabilitation programs to improve occupational performance and participation outcomes for people who have moderate to severe TBI. These programs included post‐acute rehabilitation, behavioural management and community re‐integration programs; all provided by occupational therapists or other rehabilitation professionals. From these programs, no one specific approach or setting was clearly more effective than another. Moderate evidence was also found for activity‐based interventions focussed on client‐centred goals and delivered in relevant environmental contexts. There was limited research evaluating treatment approaches focussed on improving social skills and community mobility.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-74
Number of pages2
JournalAustralian Occupational Therapy Journal
Volume65
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Feb 2018

Keywords

  • Traumatic brain injury
  • interventions
  • activity-based interventions
  • occupational therapists

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