"There is no trace of him": the Australian Red Cross, its Wounded and Missing Bureaux and the 1915 Gallipoli Campaign

Melanie Oppenheimer, Margrette Kleinig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

One of the lesser known stories of the Gallipoli campaign was the significant support provided to the Australian Imperial Force by the array of voluntary patriotic funds. Mobilized from the beginning of the war and operating both on the Home Front and in Egypt, the large support network of individuals and organizations varied from sandbag funds, the provision of recreational equipment and hostel accommodation, to foodstuffs and medical supplies. This article focuses on the Australian Red Cross, formed on the outbreak of war in August 1914 as a branch of the British Red Cross Society. Its considerable contribution as a humanitarian organization concentrating on sick and wounded soldiers in war included Wounded and Missing Bureaux. Using the records of the South Australian Red Cross Information Bureau, this article explores the beginning of this programme and its efforts to trace missing soldiers from the Gallipoli campaign for family members and friends. Through this case study analysis, we find another lens with which to examine the effects of the Gallipoli campaign on the Home Front and explore the broader social and familial effects of the war more generally.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalFirst World War Studies
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2016

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