Time-of-day dependent changes in guinea pig bladder afferent mechano-sensitivity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The voiding of urine has a clear circadian rhythm with increased voiding during active phases and decreased voiding during inactive phases. Bladder spinal afferents play a key role in the regulation of bladder storage and voiding, but it is unknown whether they exhibit themselves a potential circadian rhythm. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the mechano- and chemo- sensitivity of three major bladder afferent classes at two opposite day-night time points. Adult female guinea pigs underwent conscious voiding monitoring and bladder ex vivo single unit extracellular afferent recordings at 0300 h and 1500 h to determine day-night modulation of bladder afferent activity. All guinea pigs voided a higher amount of urine at 1500 h compared to 0300 h. This was due to an increased number of voids at 1500 h. The mechano-sensitivity of low- and high-threshold stretch-sensitive muscular-mucosal bladder afferents to mucosal stroking and stretch was significantly higher at 1500 h compared to 0300 h. Low-threshold stretch-insensitive mucosal afferent sensitivity to stroking was significantly higher at 1500 h compared to 0300 h. Further, the chemosensitivity of mucosal afferents to N-Oleoyl Dopamine (endogenous TRPV1 agonist) was also significantly increased at 1500 h compared to 0300 h. This data indicates that bladder afferents exhibit a significant time-of-day dependent variation in mechano-sensitivity which may influence urine voiding patterns. Further studies across a 24 h period are warranted to reveal potential circadian rhythm modulation of bladder afferent activity.

Original languageEnglish
Article number19283
Number of pages10
JournalScientific Reports
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Sep 2021

Keywords

  • Neuroscience
  • Physiology

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