Tools for measuring change in chronic disease management in primary care

Sally Roach, Elizabeth Kalucy, Elisabeth McIntyre

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    Abstract

    Main Messages: Valid and reliable tools and instruments exist to measure organisational processes relevant to chronic disease management. The tools can be used by GPs, Divisions of General Practice, and other primary care practitioners and organisations as part of routine organisation change, and by researchers as part of specific evaluation or research projects. The use of appropriate tools can monitor progress and contribute to quality improvement and to the evidence base about ways to bring about change. Selection of the appropriate tool should be based on the specific aims of each intervention. The tools most likely to be relevant, valid and useful in Australian primary care are: Assessment of Chronic Illness Care—evaluates utilisation of elements of the chronic care model. Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care—assesses patient’s perception of the use of the chronic care model. Primary Care Assessment Survey—captures patient perspectives on aspects of the doctor patient relationship. General Practice Assessment Questionnaire—covers access, interpersonal aspects of patient care and continuity of care. Team Climate inventory—maps shared perceptions of team functioning.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-20
    Number of pages20
    JournalFocus On...
    Volume2006
    Issue number3
    Publication statusPublished - 2006

    Bibliographical note

    Copyright Flinders University. The Primary Health Care Research and Information Service is an independent academic unit based at Flinders University in South Australia in the Department of General Practice. It is funded by the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing.

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