Top tips for embedding chronic condition self-management support into practice

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Organisational change aimed at service improvement continues to be a challenging process for many health services, managers and teams. Current imperatives to develop service models responsive to the growing demands of chronic conditions on health systems suggest that reflection on core change principles is warranted. Dominant themes for progress in embedding chronic condition self-management (CCSM) support into practice settings arose from content analyses of case studies from health professionals who have attempted to implement CCSM support into their health services after undertaking specific training (The Flinders Program of CCSM). This included in-depth interviews with 10 trainers accredited to deliver training in this CCSM care planning approach to the workforce, formal reflections from 47 postgraduate students (currently in the health workforce) enrolled in a dedicated CCSM program at Flinders University and a consensus forum with accredited trainers. Emergent themes were then considered in the context of existing organisational change and CCSM literature. Long understood principles of effective change management continue to be important, including leadership support, clear vision, team cohesion, effective people management and shared values. However, interdependence of these and other factors seems to be most important. Organisational change that builds capacity for CCSM support is possible, given a clearer understanding of where efforts will have the most positive impact on change.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)334-343
    Number of pages10
    JournalAustralian Journal of Primary Health
    Volume16
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Top tips for embedding chronic condition self-management support into practice'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this