Towards networked governance: improving interagency communication and collaboration for disaster risk management and climate change adaptation in Australia

Michael Howes, Peter Tangney, Kim Reis, Deanna Grant-Smith, Michael Heazle, Karyn Bosomworth, Paul Burton

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    55 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Major disasters, such as bushfires or floods, place significant stress on scarce public resources. Climate change is likely to exacerbate this stress. An integrated approach to disaster risk management (DRM) and climate change adaptation (CCA) could reduce the stress by encouraging the more efficient use of pooled resources and expertise. A comparative analysis of three extreme climate-related events that occurred in Australia between 2009 and 2011 indicated that a strategy to improve interagency communication and collaboration would be a key factor in this type of policy/planning integration. These findings are in accord with the concepts of Joined-up Government and Network Governance. Five key reforms are proposed: developing a shared policy vision; adopting multi-level planning; integrating legislation; networking organisations; and establishing cooperative funding. These reforms are examined with reference to the related research literature in order to identify potential problems associated with their implementation. The findings are relevant for public policy generally but are particularly useful for CCA and DRM.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)757-776
    Number of pages20
    JournalJournal of Environmental Planning and Management
    Volume58
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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