Towards the Identification of Plant and Animal Binders on Australian Stone Knives

Alisa Blee, Keryn Walshe, Allan Pring, Jamie Quinton, Claire Lenehan

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    There is limited information regarding the nature of plant and animal residues used as adhesives, fixatives and pigments found on Australian Aboriginal artefacts. This paper reports the use of FTIR in combination with the chemometric tools principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clustering (HC) for the analysis and identification of Australian plant and animal fixatives on Australian stone artefacts. Ten different plant and animal residues were able to be discriminated from each other at a species level by combining FTIR spectroscopy with the chemometric data analysis methods, principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clustering (HC). Application of this method to residues from three broken stone knives from the collections of the South Australian Museum indicated that two of the handles of knives were likely to have contained beeswax as the fixative whilst Spinifex resin was the probable binder on the third.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)745-750
    Number of pages6
    JournalTalanta
    Volume82
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

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