Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 (TAAR1): Molecular and Clinical Insights for the Treatment of Schizophrenia and Related Comorbidities

Pramod C. Nair, Justin M. Chalker, Ross A. McKinnon, Christopher J. Langmead, Karen J. Gregory, Tarun Bastiampillai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Schizophrenia is a complex and severe mental illness. Current treatments for schizophrenia typically modulate dopaminergic neurotransmission by D2-receptor blockade. While reducing positive symptoms of schizophrenia, current antipsychotic drugs have little clinical effect on negative symptoms and cognitive impairments. For the last few decades, discovery efforts have sought nondopaminergic compounds with the aim to effectively treat the broad symptoms of schizophrenia. In this viewpoint, we provide an overview on trace-amine associated receptor-1 (TAAR1), which presents a clinically validated nondopaminergic target for treating schizophrenia and related disorders, with significantly less overall side-effect burden. TAAR1 agonists may also be specifically beneficial for the substance abuse comorbidity and metabolic syndrome that is often present in patients with schizophrenia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)183-188
Number of pages6
JournalACS Pharmacology and Translational Science
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Mar 2022

Keywords

  • antipsychotics
  • depression
  • molecular dynamics
  • trace amines
  • treatment-resistant schizophrenia
  • ulotaront

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