Trajectories of problem video gaming among adult regular gamers: An 18-month longitudinal study

Daniel L. King, Paul H. Delfabbro, Mark D. Griffiths

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A three-wave, longitudinal study examined the long-term trajectory of problem gaming symptoms among adult regular video gamers. Potential changes in problem gaming status were assessed at two intervals using an online survey over an 18-month period. Participants (N=117) were recruited by an advertisement posted on the public forums of multiple Australian video game-related websites. Inclusion criteria were being of adult age and having a video gaming history of at least 1 hour of gaming every week over the past 3 months. Two groups of adult video gamers were identified: Those players who did (N=37) and those who did not (N=80) identify as having a serious gaming problem at the initial survey intake. The results showed that regular gamers who self-identified as having a video gaming problem at baseline reported more severe problem gaming symptoms than normal gamers, at all time points. However, both groups experienced a significant decline in problem gaming symptoms over an 18-month period, controlling for age, video gaming activity, and psychopathological symptoms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)72-76
Number of pages5
JournalCyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jan 2013
Externally publishedYes

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