Trajectories of Substance Use and Well‐being in Early and Middle Adolescence Shaped by Social Connectedness

Alexander O'Donnell, Jaimee Stuart, Paul Jose, Jacqueline Homel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Increasing substance use and decreasing well‐being are typical in adolescence, yet how social contexts shape disparate development during this time is less well‐understood. A latent growth class analysis was conducted that identified groups of early (N = 706; Agem = 12.20) and middle (N = 666; Agem = 14.38) adolescents distinguished by rates of substance use and well‐being over three years. In both cohorts, the largest group reported low substance use and high well‐being, with a smaller group exhibiting maladaptive trajectories for both substance use and well‐being. Two additional groups were identified during middle adolescence characterized by either low well‐being or high substance use. Family connectedness was a protective factor, while high peer connectedness was a risk factor for substance‐use groups and low peer connectedness for languishing.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Research on Adolescence
Early online date7 May 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 7 May 2021

Keywords

  • substance abuse
  • adolescents
  • Well-being
  • Connectedness

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