Trends in soft drink and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among South Australians, focusing on distribution of intake by subpopulation

Emma Dawes, Katina D'Onise, Nicola Spurrier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
2 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objective: This study focused on describing local trends in sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption, including variations between subgroups, to inform equitable health policy to curb soft drink consumption.

Methods: Weighted data were obtained from the South Australian Monitoring and Surveillance System, a state-based population health survey that monitors trends in health risk factors and chronic disease via computer-assisted telephone interviewing. From 2008 onwards, participants provided an estimate of the average amount of soft drink they consumed per day.

Results: From 2008–2017, there were significant decreases in the proportion of adults who consumed any SSBs, but the mean consumption per consumer increased. High-risk dietary and lifestyle behaviours are the strongest predictors for consumption of soft drink, but there is also a significant association with socioeconomic status.

Conclusions: Population trends mask increasing inequity. There is a societal trend away from the consumption of SSBs across all subgroups, but at-risk groups who engage in clusters of unhealthy behaviours remain high consumers.

Implications for public health: The identification of at-risk populations allows research to focus more precisely on the structural barriers, beliefs, attitudes and facilitators of ongoing consumption of SSB in order to inform future health promotion efforts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)410-418
Number of pages9
JournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
Volume44
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • equity
  • SSB
  • sugar-sweetened beverages
  • trends

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