Tribal Cultural Resource Management. The Full Circle to Stewardship

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationBook/Film/Article review

Abstract

The controversy over 'who owns the past' can become particularly heated when it involve the archaeology of Indigenous peoples.A potential for conflict is integral to Indigenous archaeology, since it involves a cultural heritage in which other people have both rights and responsibilities. Certainly, the question of who has a right to take control of the past is one that informs many of the day-to-day interactions between archaeologists and Indigenous peoples in various parts of the world. Many of these issues have been resolved in Australia, where archaeologists and Indigenous Australians generally have harmonious relationships. In much of the USA, however, the situation is very different. For many American archaeologists,Tribal Cultural Resource Management. The Full Circle to Stewardship will probably be seen as radical, even militant, since it is based on a recognition of Indigenous rights in Indigenous cultural heritage. From an Australian point of view, however, the radical aspects of this book relate not to Indigenous rights in Indigenous cultural heritage, but to the pro-active and entrepreneurial approach to cultural heritage management being taken by Native American tribes
Original languageEnglish
Pages100
Number of pages1
Volume39
No.2
Specialist publicationArchaeology in Oceania
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2004

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