Two late‐Glacial avifaunas from eastern North Island, New Zealand ‐ Te Aute Swamp and Wheturau Quarry

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Abstract

Late‐Glacial faunas from Wheturau Quarry near Gisborne and Te Aute near Napier North Island New Zealand are described and radiocarbon dates presented These faunas suggest that the eastern North Island was covered in open shrubland until 10 500 yrs B P There were significant changes in the fauna of the eastern North Island during the early Holocene, when the dominant moa species was replaced, the key species Cnemtorms gracilis disappeared from the fauna, and others such as Eunanas finschi, became scarce The Wheturau fauna includes the largest collection of Cnemionm gracilis bones yet found, and a storm petrel that may be Oceamtes maonanus, named from three skins collected last century off Banks Peninsula The Te Aute site is notable for the large number of moa bones preserved, especially Euryapteryx curtus and Dinoinis giganteus It is also the type locality for Dinornis gazella Oliver, Cnemioims giacilis Forbes, Cu cus teautetnsis Forbes, Circus hamiltom Forbes, and Phalaciocorax novaezealandiae var major Forbes The record of Harpagornis moorei from Te Aute is shown to have been an error in identification by Hamilton, and Harpagornis is therefore unknown from the North Island.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-25
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of the Royal Society of New Zealand
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

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