Use of a syndromic surveillance system to describe the trend in cycling-related presentations to emergency departments in Sydney

Michael Dinh, Christopher Kastelein, Kendall Bein, Timothy Green, Tanya Bautovich, Rebecca Ivers

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objectives: To describe population-based trends in cycling-related presentations to EDs over the past decade. Methods: A retrospective cohort of road trauma patients (motor vehicle, motor cyclist, cyclist and pedestrian) presenting to EDs in the Sydney Greater Metropolitan Area between 2004 and 2013 was obtained using the Public Health Real-time Emergency Department Surveillance System. The outcomes of interest were the cycling-related ED presentation rate per 1000 population, as well as the proportion of cycling-related presentations that died in ED or were admitted to a critical care ward. Trends in ED presentation rates based on presentation counts and Sydney population data were plotted and described. Results: There were 68438 cycling-related presentations identified, representing 30% of all road trauma patients presenting to EDs in Sydney. There was a 91% increase in cycling-related presentations for the 35 to 64-year-old age group and a 123% increase in cycling-related presentations in the 65-year-old and over age group. All other age groups were associated with a stable or decrease in cycling-related ED presentation rates. The proportion of presentations requiring critical care ward admission or death in ED has decreased by 20%. Conclusion: Using an ED syndromic surveillance system, cycling-related ED presentation rates in Sydney Australia have increased in those aged 35 years and over the past 10 years, with a relative

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)343-347
    Number of pages5
    JournalEmergency Medicine Australasia
    Volume27
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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