Use of Indigenous Informed Epistemologies can inform Intervention Models to Fight COVID-19 in Africa

Tinashe Dune, Hailay Gesesew, Kiros Hiruy, Hyacinth Udah, Vanessa Lee, Ruyamuro Kwedza, Lillian Mwanri

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has put the world in unprecedented health and economic crisis threatening human existence and livelihoods. The pandemic has brought the world to a standstill and, has infected over 15 million and killed over 620 thousand people globally1. The socioeconomic impact of the pandemic is also expected to be higher. Reports indicate that in the USA alone, over 38 million people have lost their jobs due to the pandemic. Reports from Europe and other parts of the world also depict a grim picture. The pandemic has affected other regions such as Australasia where significant loss of jobs and livelihoods, and changes in societal resilience manifesting in increased mental health problems and domestic violence were reported.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)46-48
Number of pages3
JournalAfrican Journal of Reproductive Health
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2020

Keywords

  • Coronavirus
  • COVID-19
  • COVID-19 in Africa
  • Intervention models
  • Indigenous Informed Epistemologies
  • Pandemic

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