Use of time in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Longitudinal associations with symptoms and quality of life using a compositional analysis approach

Hayley Lewthwaite, Tim Olds, Marie T. Williams, Tanja W. Effing, Dorothea Dumuid

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Background and objectives This study explored whether, for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), changes to the 24-hour composition of physical activity (PA), sedentary behaviour (SB) and sleep were associated with changes in symptoms and health-related quality of life (HRQoL); and how time re-allocations between these behaviours were associated with changes in outcomes. Methods This study pools data on people with COPD drawn from two previous studies: a randomised controlled trial of cognitive behavioural therapy and pulmonary rehabilitation and a usual care cohort. Participants recalled behaviours and completed symptom and HRQoL assessments at baseline (T0) and four months (T1). Linear mixed-effects models (pooled control/ intervention samples) predicted changes in outcomes from T0 to T1 with a change to the 24-hour behaviour composition; compositional isotemporal substitution predicted change in outcomes when re-allocating time between behaviours. Results Valid data were obtained for 95 participants (forced expiratory volume in one second %predicted = 49.6±15.3) at T0 and T1. A change in the 24-hour behaviour composition was associated with a change in anxiety (p<0.01) and mastery (p<0.01), but not breathlessness, depression or fatigue. When modelling time re-allocation with compositional isotemporal substitution, more time re-allocated to higher intensity PA or sleep was associated with favourable changes in outcomes; re-allocating time to SB or light PA was associated with unfavourable changes in outcomes. The direction of association, however, could not be determined. Conclusion To improve the overall health and wellbeing of people with COPD, intervention approaches that optimise the composition of PA, SB and sleep may be beneficial.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0214058
JournalPLoS One
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Mar 2019

Bibliographical note

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License,which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium,provided the original author and source are credited.

Keywords

  • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • quality of life
  • compositional analysis

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