Using a Game Sense Approach to Teach Buroinjin as an Aboriginal Game to Address Social Justice in Physical Education

John Williams, Shane Pill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In writing this article, we concur with Azzarito, Macdonald, Dagkas, and Fisette (2017) that new critical pedagogical approaches are required to foster social justice and question “taken-for-granted” education practices that serve to reinforce dominant cultures while marginalizing minority cultures. The two main aims of this article are (a) to show how self-study can operate as an effective professional learning opportunity and (b) to demonstrate how a Game Sense Approach (GSA) can be used to teach the traditional Australian Aboriginal game, Buroinjin (Australian Sports Commission [ASC], 2008), in physical education (PE) to address issues of social justice. Here, we use self-study as a methodology for investigating professional environments by blending an examination of self and practice (Fletcher & Casey, 2014; MacPhail, 2014).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalJOURNAL OF TEACHING IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - Sep 2019

Keywords

  • Indigenous
  • quality
  • physical education
  • self-study

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Using a Game Sense Approach to Teach Buroinjin as an Aboriginal Game to Address Social Justice in Physical Education'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this