Validation of continuous clinical indices of cardiometabolic risk in a cohort of Australian adults

Suzanne J. Carroll, Catherine Paquet, Natasha J. Howard, Robert J Adams, Anne W. Taylor, Mark Daniel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Indicators of cardiometabolic risk typically include non-clinical factors (e.g., smoking). While the incorporation of non-clinical factors can improve absolute risk prediction, it is impossible to study the contribution of non-clinical factors when they are both predictors and part of the outcome measure. Metabolic syndrome, incorporating only clinical measures, seems a solution yet provides no information on risk severity. The aims of this study were: 1) to construct two continuous clinical indices of cardiometabolic risk (cCICRs), and assess their accuracy in predicting 10-year incident cardiovascular disease and/or type 2 diabetes; and 2) to compare the predictive accuracies of these cCICRs with existing risk indicators that incorporate non-clinical factors (Framingham Risk Scores). Methods: Data from a population-based biomedical cohort (n = 4056) were used to construct two cCICRs from waist circumference, mean arteriole pressure, fasting glucose, triglycerides and high density lipoprotein: 1) the mean of standardised risk factors (cCICR-Z); and 2) the weighted mean of the two first principal components from principal component analysis (cCICR-PCA). The predictive accuracies of the two cCICRs and the Framingham Risk Scores were assessed and compared using ROC curves. Results: Both cCICRs demonstrated moderate accuracy (AUCs 0.72 - 0.76) in predicting incident cardiovascular disease and/or type 2 diabetes, among men and women. There were no significant differences between the predictive accuracies of the cCICRs and the Framingham Risk Scores. Conclusions: cCICRs may be useful in research investigating associations between non-clinical factors and health by providing suitable alternatives to current risk indicators which include non-clinical factors.

Original languageEnglish
Article number27
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalBMC Cardiovascular Disorders
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

(CC-BY 4.0) Open Access article licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0).

Keywords

  • Cardiometabolic
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Risk scores
  • ROC
  • AUC
  • Validation

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