Variation in polymer types and abundance of microplastics from two rivers and beaches in Adelaide, South Australia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Microplastics are a major source of marine pollution and comprise of many recyclable polymers. For this study, we investigated the prevalence of microplastic polymers in an urban and non-urban setting and determined what type of plastic polymers was most common in these areas. This was conducted by extracting sediment and sand samples from 2 rivers and beaches in Adelaide, South Australia. The microplastics were extracted using density separation and were identified using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. We found a significantly higher abundance of microplastics and variety of polymers in the sediment of the Patawalonga creek, compared to the less urbanised environment. Most of the microplastics found in the study were from recyclable products which highlight the lack of recycling practices undertaken by the inhabitants of that area.

Original languageEnglish
Article number112842
Number of pages11
JournalMarine Pollution Bulletin
Volume172
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2021

Keywords

  • Environmental influence
  • Plastic pollution
  • Plastic sources
  • Polymers
  • Sediment

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Variation in polymer types and abundance of microplastics from two rivers and beaches in Adelaide, South Australia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this