Victoria’s low availability of public psychiatric beds and the impact on patients, carers and staff

Stephen Allison, Tarun Bastiampillai, David Castle

    Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    For decades, governments in high-income countries have made savings by moving long-term responsibilities for severe mental illness (SMI) to unpaid informal carers. As governments closed beds in standalone mental hospitals, financial and emotional burdens were shifted to the families of people with SMI. While community teams offer first-line treatment by visiting patients at home, carers often do the bulk of the work, spending an average of 5–6 hours per day supporting a relative with SMI, saving governments the cost of providing comparable care and accommodation (Yesufu-Udechuku et al., 2015). These daily demands increase the stress on families with deleterious effects on carers’ health, wellbeing, occupational status and finances (Yesufu-Udechuku et al., 2015).
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)91-92
    Number of pages2
    JournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
    Volume52
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

    Keywords

    • Victoria
    • public psychiatric beds
    • impact
    • mental illness
    • informal carers
    • family stress
    • carer's health

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