We Do Not See Things as They Are, We See Them as We Are: A Multidimensional Worldview Model of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Guy Doron, Michael Kyrios, Richard Moulding, Maja Nedeljkovic, Sunil Bhar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cognitive-behavioral models of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) assign a central role to specific beliefs and coping strategies in the development, maintenance and exacerbation of obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptoms. These models also implicate perceptions of self and the world in the development and maintenance of OC phenomena (e.g., overestimation of threat, sociotropy, ambivalent or sensitive sense of self, looming vulnerability), although such self and world domains have not always been emphasized in recent research. Following recent recommendations (Doron & Kyrios, 2005), the present study undertook a multifaceted investigation of self and world perceptions in a nonclinical sample, using a coherent worldview framework (Janoff-Bulman, 1989, 1991). Beliefs regarding the self and the world were found to predict OC symptom severity over and above beliefs outlined in traditional cognitive-behavioral models of OCD. Self and world beliefs were also related to other OC-relevant beliefs. Implications of these findings for theory and treatment of OCD are discussed
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)217-231
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Cognitive Psychotherapy: An International Quarterly
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • cognitive theory
  • obsessive compulsive disorder
  • cognition
  • self
  • worldview
  • internal representations

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