Web-based lecture technologies: Highlighting the changing nature of teaching and learning

Greg Preston, Rob Phillips, Maree Gosper, Margot McNeill, Karen Woo, David Green

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    38 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    There is now widespread recognition of the changing nature of students in higher education: they are demographically diverse, have extensive external time demands, and expect greater flexibility and support during their programs. As a consequence of this and other changes to the higher education sector, many universities worldwide have introduced a range of information and communication technologies to provide students with flexible options for study. Included in these options are web-based lecture technologies (WBLT), designed to digitally record lectures for delivery over the web. This paper reports on recent Australian research into the impact of WBLT on learning and teaching which indicates that, while many academics recognise the changing nature and needs of their students and have introduced WBLT as a consequence, many have not reconceptualised their curriculum and its delivery to meet these changing circumstances. The central premise in this paper is that the introduction of WBLT has been disruptive in nature and has provided a lens with which to view several emerging issues: the blurring of study patterns between internal and external enrolment modes; the role of lectures in technology rich environments; and the changing nature of teaching when technologies are introduced into the curriculum.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)717-728
    Number of pages12
    JournalAustralasian Journal of Educational Technology
    Volume26
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

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