Wellbeing Outcomes and Risk and Protective Factors for Parents with Migrant and Refugee Backgrounds from the Middle East in the First 1000 Days: A Systematic Review

Amelia Kate Winter, Clemence Due, Anna Ziersch

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Abstract

The First 1000 Days (the period from conception to a child’s second birthday) is an important developmental period. However, little is known about experiences of parents with refugee and migrant backgrounds during this period. A systematic review was conducted according to PRISMA guidelines. Publications were identified through searches of the Embase, PsycINFO, PubMed, and Scopus databases, critically appraised, and synthesised using thematic analysis. A total of 35 papers met inclusion criteria. Depressive symptomatology was consistently higher than global averages, however maternal depression conceptualisations differed across studies. Several papers reported changes in relationship dynamics as a result of having a baby post-migration. Consistent relationships were found between social and health support and wellbeing. Conceptualisations of wellbeing may differ among migrant families. Limited understanding of health services and relationships with health providers may impede help-seeking. Several research gaps were identified, particularly in relation to the wellbeing of fathers, and of parents of children over 12 months old.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Early online date6 Jul 2023
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 6 Jul 2023

Keywords

  • First 1000 days
  • Maternal health
  • Migrants
  • Refugees
  • Systematic review
  • Wellbeing

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