What are students doing? An evaluation of informal ICT affordance-effectivity seeking behaviours during formal active-learning tutorials

Gillian Kette, Lambert Schuwirth, Julie Ash

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Students are controlling their information needs by accessing Information-Communication-Technologies (ICT) on smart devices. Universities also utilise ICT affordances to present courses. Yet pedagogies, such as active-learning, have remained unchanged from prior to the advent of ICT. Essentially education pedagogies are assumed to be compatible with ICT affordances. But this is not known. Active learning, such as Problem-Based-Learning (PBL), presumes the learner activates their memory to learn and not their smart devices. Learning is considered a cognitive and constructivist process whereby the learner actively constructs knowledge through collaboratively working in small groups on contextually relevant scenarios. So the question is when ICT access during active-learning incurs a cost on learning and cognition and when it adds?
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages2
Publication statusPublished - 2018
EventANZAHPE 2018: Sustainability for Health Professions Education - Hotel Grand Chancellor, Hobart, Australia
Duration: 1 Jul 20184 Jul 2018

Conference

ConferenceANZAHPE 2018
CountryAustralia
CityHobart
Period1/07/184/07/18

Keywords

  • Information-Communication-Technologies (ICT)
  • active learning
  • education pedagogies
  • Problem-Based-Learning (PBL)

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