Whatever it takes? Access for women with disabilities to domestic and family violence services. Key findings and future directions

Patsie Frawley, Sue Dyson, Sally Robinson

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned reportpeer-review

2 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Gender inequality is at the root of gender-based violence. Violence against women is not limited to any particular group or class in society, and gender intersects with other forms of difference to compound discrimination, which in turn affects the experience of violence and abuse for individuals. The complexity of lived experience is dependent on factors such as gender, race, class, culture, sexuality and gender diversity, and disability, among others. These factors also differ across time and according to geographical location and are not the same for everyone. This is theorised as intersectionality (McCall, 2005). Understanding these intersecting factors and how they impact on access is particularly relevant for tertiary response services (Ortoleva & Lewis, 2012). The study reported here draws on the experiences of women with disabilities who have experienced violence and abuse and used tertiary response services. It situates the perspectives of women with disabilities within case study sites—domestic and family violence (DFV) and two specialist models that provide tertiary response services to people with disabilities—and expands on the promising practice within these services through action research with local groups formed from the sites. This research has informed the development of recommendations and guidelines for improved access and effective practice.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationSydney
PublisherANROWS
Number of pages12
Volume5
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • gender-based violence
  • discrimination
  • women
  • disabilities
  • abuse

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Whatever it takes? Access for women with disabilities to domestic and family violence services. Key findings and future directions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this