Which Type of Antismoking Advertisement Is Perceived as More Effective? An Experimental Study With a Sample of Australian Socially Disadvantaged Welfare Recipients

Ashleigh Guillaumier, Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul, Catherine d'Este, Sarah Durkin, Christopher Doran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: Evaluate the perceived effectiveness of key antismoking messages among highly disadvantaged smokers and assess the impact of nicotine dependence and cessation cognitions on message processing.

DESIGN: The experimental crossover trial, undertaken between March and December 2012, randomly exposed participants to two of three antismoking advertisements delivered via touchscreen computer.

SETTING: Welfare recipients were recruited from a community service organization in New South Wales, Australia.

SUBJECTS: Subjects were 354 smokers (79% response rate). Participants resided in government rental housing (52%), earned less than AUD$400/wk (72%), and received their primary income from government welfare (95%).

INTERVENTION: Three 30-second antismoking television advertisements representing common campaign themes: why to quit (graphic imagery), why to quit (personal testimonial), or how to quit.

MEASURES: An 11-item scale assessed perceived effectiveness and message acceptance. An eight-item cessation cognitions index assessed motivations and readiness to quit, and the heaviness of smoking index was used to classify nicotine dependence.

ANALYSIS: Descriptive statistics, generalized linear mixed models, and multiple linear regression analyses are reported.

RESULTS: Why-to-quit advertisements were perceived as significantly more effective than the how-to-quit advertisement (all p < .0001). Smokers with positive cessation cognitions were more likely to accept antismoking messages (p = .0003) and perceive them as effective (p < .0001). Nicotine dependence level did not influence message acceptance (p = .7322) or effectiveness (p = .8872).

CONCLUSION: Highly emotive advertisements providing good reasons to quit may be the most effective in promoting the antismoking message among groups with high smoking rates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)209-216
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal of health promotion : AJHP
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Health focus: smoking control
  • Outcome measure: cognitive
  • Research purpose: descriptive
  • Setting: clinical/health care
  • Strategy: behavior change
  • Study design: quasi-experimental
  • Target population change: adults
  • Target population: education/income level
  • Tobacco, Health Promotion, Socioeconomic Factors, Mass Media, Prevention Research. Manuscript format: research

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