Who is More Likely to Use the Internet for Health Behavior Change? A Cross-Sectional Survey of Internet Use Among Smokers and Nonsmokers Who Are Orthopedic Trauma Patients

Sam McCrabb, Amanda L Baker, John Attia, Zsolt J Balogh, Natalie Lott, Kerrin Palazzi, Justine Naylor, Ian A Harris, Christopher Doran, Johnson George, Luke Wolfenden, Eliza Skelton, Billie Bonevski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
43 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: eHealth presents opportunities to provide population groups with accessible health interventions, although knowledge about Internet access, peoples' interest in using the Internet for health, and users' characteristics are required prior to eHealth program development. Objective: This study surveyed hospital patients to examine rates of Internet use, interest in using the Internet for health, and respondent characteristics related to Internet use and interest in using the Internet for health. For patients who smoke, preferences for types of smoking cessation programs for use at home and while in hospital were also examined. Methods: An online cross-sectional survey was used to survey 819 orthopedic trauma patients (response rate: 72.61%, 819/1128) from two public hospitals in New South Wales, Australia. Logistic regressions were used to examine associations between variables. Results: A total of 72.7% (574/790) of respondents had at least weekly Internet access and more than half (56.6%, 357/631) reported interest in using the Internet for health. Odds of at least weekly Internet usage were higher if the individual was born overseas (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.27-3.82, P=.005), had a tertiary education (OR 3.75, 95% CI 2.41-5.84, P<.001), or was a nonsmoker (OR 3.75, 95% CI 2.41-5.84, P<.001). Interest in using the Internet for health increased with high school (OR 1.85, 95% CI 1.09-3.15, P=.02) or tertiary education (OR 2.48, 95% CI 1.66-3.70, P<.001), and if household incomes were more than AUS $100,000 (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.25-4.97, P=.009). Older individuals were less interested in using the Internet for health (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.97-0.99, P<.001). Conclusions: Online interventions may be a potential tool for health care in this hospitalized population.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere18
Pages (from-to)e18
Number of pages14
JournalJMIR mental health
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 May 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Internet
  • health
  • eHealth
  • health care
  • smoking
  • orthopedic trauma
  • Health care
  • Health
  • Orthopedic trauma
  • Smoking

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Who is More Likely to Use the Internet for Health Behavior Change? A Cross-Sectional Survey of Internet Use Among Smokers and Nonsmokers Who Are Orthopedic Trauma Patients'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this