Will policy makers hear my disability experience? How participatory research contributes to managing interest conflict in policy implementation

Karen R. Fisher, Sally Robinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Participatory evaluation gives primacy to the experience of people affected by the policy. How realistic is it for researchers to persuade government of its benefits, given the gap between participatory policy theory and government evaluation practice? We apply this question to the Resident Support Program evaluation. The program coordinates support for people living in boarding houses and hostels in Queensland, Australia. We found that a participatory, longitudinal, formative evaluation process facilitated service user contribution to research outcomes, service experiences and policy implementation. In addition, the values position of participatory research can contribute to managing interest conflict in policy implementation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)207-220
Number of pages14
JournalSocial Policy and Society
Volume9
Issue number2
Early online date1 Mar 2010
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • disability
  • policy
  • participation
  • inclusion

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