Women’s experiences of their interactions with health care providers during the postnatal period in Australia: a qualitative systematic review protocol

Danielle Pollock, Megan Cooper, Alexa McArthur, Timothy Barker, Zachary Munn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective:
The objective of the review is to explore and evaluate women's experiences of interactions with health care providers during their postnatal period.

Introduction:
The postnatal period is a transformative time for women. Women experience significant change and adaptation, which could impact upon parenting confidence, health, and psychological outcomes during this time. The interaction women have with their health care providers during the postnatal period plays an integral role in improving these health outcomes.

Inclusion criteria:
This qualitative review will explore the experiences of primiparous and multiparous women during the postnatal period with a key focus on evaluating the interactions they have with health care providers. It will include all studies that utilize qualitative methods (such as interviews and focus groups). Articles that explore the postnatal care experiences of women who have endured a pregnancy loss, given birth to a baby with complex needs, or those that solely focus on describing the neonatal and intensive care experiences, will not be included.

Methods:
PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, Emcare, and PsycINFO will be searched. Studies published from 2000 onwards and written in English will be assessed for inclusion. Studies that are selected initially will be assessed for methodological quality by two independent reviewers utilizing the JBI critical appraisal instrument for qualitative research.

Systematic review registration number:
PROSPERO CRD42020186384
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)622-628
Number of pages7
JournalJBI evidence synthesis
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Oct 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Midwifery
  • Postnatal Care
  • Satisfaction

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