‘Working for the Duration?’: Aspects of Voluntary Work in Queensland during World War Two

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Abstract

This paper will examine aspects of voluntarism and the voluntary principle on the home front in Australia during World War Two. The general assumptions which pervade historical texts and public consciousness consistently refer to voluntary work as simply knitting socks and balaclavas and little else. In fact the voluntary work carried out during World War Two was far more encompassing, complex and multifaceted. It may be surprising to some, although not, I suspect, to those who lived through the war, that voluntary work was extensive, crossed class and cultural boundaries, and had the overwhelming support of the community. Although this paper will focus on the state of Queensland, it is important to give a general outline of the types of voluntary work carried out on the home front, and what was involved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-82
Number of pages10
JournalQUEENSLAND REVIEW
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1996

Keywords

  • Voluntarism
  • World War II
  • World War Two
  • Voluntary work
  • Queensland

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