Working towards a culturally safe optometry workforce for first nations peoples in Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand

Renata Watene, Shannon L. Davies, Lilon G. Bandler, Donna Murray, Nicola Anstice, Shelley Hopkins, Andrew Collins, Mitchell D. Anjou, Kelley Baldwin, Susan L. Kelly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Australian and New Zealand Indigenous cultures are instantly recognisable in any international forum. Aboriginal Australian culture, in particular, is revered as the oldest continuous living culture on the planet.2 Conversely, Māori, is the youngest. Whilst vastly different, they hold several similar core values: connections to land, people, language, custom and tradition. Importantly, they also share a traumatic and turbulent history with the European colonisers, contributing significantly to the disparities experienced by First Nations Peoples in the modern health system.3,4 This viewpoint article written through the lens of Indigenous practitioners and patients from Australia and Aotearoa/New Zealand and vetted by experts and leaders in Indigenous eyecare may not be a comfortable read. It is intended to challenge the reader, in order to better understand what is required for Indigenous people, to thrive in optometry and how the profession can improve the availability of culturally safe, patient-centred services and to elevate the eye health outcomes of our Indigenous patients.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages5
JournalClinical and Experimental Optometry
Early online date26 Jul 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 26 Jul 2022

Keywords

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Eye Care
  • Cultural safety in optometry
  • Culturally safe eye care
  • First Nations Eye Care
  • Maori Eye Care

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