Young-Onset Gastrointestinal Adenocarcinoma Incidence and Survival Trends in the Northern Territory, Australia, with Emphasis on Indigenous Peoples

Mia Shepherdson, Shalem Leemaqz, Gurmeet Singh, Courtney Ryder, Shahid Ullah, Karla Canuto, Joanne Young, Timothy Price, Ross McKinnon, Stephen Pandol, Claire Roberts, Savio Barreto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study from the Australian Northern Territory’s Cancer Registry data provides evidence for a significant decrease in incidence of gastrointestinal (oesophageal, stomach, small intestine, colon, rectum, and pancreas) adenocarcinomas over the last 3 decades in individuals aged >50 years, whilst the younger (18–50 years) cohort has remained unchanged with a (non-significant) trend towards an increase. There has been a significantly improved overall survival in both age cohorts. An insight into these trends amongst Australia’s Indigenous (who constitute 31% of the territory’s population) confirms that while the incidence was significantly lower in Indigenous patients compared to non-Indigenous patients, in both age cohorts, Indigenous patients had worse survival rates. This study calls for a concerted effort aimed at investigating the existence of modifiable sociodemographic factors underlying these disturbing trends. There is a need to enhance preventative strategies, as well as to improve the delivery of cancer care and its uptake amongst Indigenous peoples.
Original languageEnglish
Article number2870
Number of pages14
JournalCancers
Volume14
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Jun 2022

Keywords

  • Outcomes
  • Morbidity
  • Stomach
  • Pancreas
  • Colon
  • Indigenous

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